Tag Archive for: Alopecia

Men’s Hair Can Be Damaged and Dry Too. Here’s What You Can Do.

Men usually worry more about losing their hair than about if their hair is healthy.  Women are generally the ones who stress over dry, damaged hair.  After all, hair dryers, flat irons, bleaching, coloring, tight ponytails, and braids can take a toll.  Most men are happy not to deal with all of that.  Even so, it’s not ideal when men’s hair looks dried out or frizzy.  Not to mention that hair that doesn’t look healthy sometimes isn’t.  So, guys, let’s talk about your hair’s appearance and texture.  We have some tips on how to improve your hair’s condition and what to do if you think there’s something causing damage that’s out of your control.

What Causes Men to Experience Dry Hair?

Before we talk about what you can do to repair your hair, let’s discuss the reasons why your hair may be dry or damaged.  Let’s start understanding what happens when your hair gets dried out.  Oils that keep your hair healthy are produced in your hair’s roots.  There isn’t a source of natural lubrication.  When your hair’s natural oil and moisture are lost, it also loses its smooth texture and shine.   There are many reasons why this could happen.  The most common reasons are aging, health conditions such as thyroid disease, and the effects of sun, wind, and other weather-related conditions.  If your hair begins to thin due to male pattern baldness, your hair’s texture can also change.  Thinner hair can become wavy, dry, and brittle.  

How Does Men’s Hair Get Damaged?

Here’s what happens when your hair gets damaged.  Each strand of your hair is protected by a cuticle, which is a protective layer.  When your hair cuticles are healthy, they sit closely together and lock in moisture.  The cuticle protects your hair from elements such as chlorine and sun exposure.  However, those cuticles can peel away from your hair when they separate.  Your hair can’t hold moisture or natural oils.  Contrary to what many people believe, you cannot repair damaged hair.  It’s not a living tissue and doesn’t have regenerative abilities.  However, damaged hair that is cut can grow healthy cuticles.   

How Guys Treat Dry or Damaged Hair

If your hair doesn’t look in tip-top shape, all is not lost.  Here are some tips that can help:

  • Use the Right Shampoo 

If a two-in-one is your go-to for the shower, you may want to rethink your shampoo.  A good quality shampoo helps not only clean your hair, but will help balance your scalp’s chemistry.  Shampoos include detergents, pH adjusters, preservatives, thickeners, scents, and additives.  Harsh ingredients strip the oils out of your hair.  If your hair is dry, you’ll want to avoid lauryl sulfates, sarcosinates, and other harsh ingredients known for deep cleaning.   Instead, look for mild cleaning agents such as polyoxyethylene fatty alcohols, polyoxyethylene sorbitol esters alkanolamides, betaines, sultaines, and other gentle cleansers that also help make your hair more manageable. (01)

  • Remember the Conditioner

Skipping conditioner may save time, but it also means that you’re missing the opportunity to add moisture.  Conditioning seals your hair’s cuticles to keep the moisture locked in between washes.  Topical hair loss treatments such as Minoxidil or Finasteride may affect the texture of your hair, especially at the beginning when the medications first start working.  A good conditioner can help by making your hair more shiny and manageable.  Conditioners will often include ingredients such as hydrolyzed silk, animal protein, and glycerin.  When selecting a conditioner, look for protein-derived substances.  Protein works with the keratin in your hair to hold the cortex fragments together.  Your split ends will mend temporarily until the next time you shampoo. (02) 

  • Hair Masks Aren’t Just for Women

If you’re looking for a quick-fix to make your dry, brittle hair softer and more manageable, we’re going to share a secret weapon to treat your hair: hair masks.  Yes, women are the ones who usually use hair masks.  But, not only can men use them once or twice per week, they give short-term results that make your hair stronger, shinier, and tamer.  Keep in mind that you should only apply a hair mask from the roots to the ends of your hair.  Hair masks aren’t meant to be used on your scalp. The hair mask that you choose will depend on your hair’s texture.  It’s helpful to look for keywords such as “fine” or “coarse” that match your hair type.  Hair masks with all-natural ingredients and keywords such as “keratin” and “biotin” are good choices.  

  • Visit Your Barber Regularly

Sure, it was probably fun having long Covid hair and not having to visit the barber every five weeks.  However, if your hair is dry or damaged, it’s important to keep those appointments.  Overgrown split ends make your hair look messy and frizzy.  Not to mention that when men go too long between trims, they end up with an awkward, unflattering shape that’s tricky to camouflage.  No matter how many styling products you use, your hair will still look unkempt. 

  • Eat a Protein-rich Diet

If your hair is dry or damaged, make sure you’re eating plenty of protein.  Protein will strengthen and repair the keratin in your hair strands.  You’ll still need a trim to get rid of the damaged ends, but more protein and keratin means your hair will grow stronger.  A lack of protein has actually been linked to hair loss. (03)  When your body doesn’t get enough protein, your body will conserve what it has by shifting hair into a resting phase when your hair falls out.  Good protein sources include eggs, chicken, shrimp, fatty fish, nuts, tofu, legumes, and cottage cheese. 

  • Ask Your Dermatologist About Vitamins or Supplements

If your hair is dry or damaged and you aren’t sure why, it may be a good idea to have your vitamin, iron, thyroid, and other blood levels checked.  Hyper and hypothyroidism can both cause dry, brittle hair.  Low iron and other vitamin deficiencies can cause the same effect.  Balancing your thyroid or supplementing with vitamins usually brings noticeable improvement.  

  • Stop Using Harsh Coloring Products

If you color your hair and notice signs of damage, it’s a good idea to stop.  In some cases, hair dye lifts the cuticle from the hair and changes the texture.  The hair that’s been colored won’t return to its natural state.  However, only the hair that has been dyed will be affected.  New hair that grows from your scalp will have your original texture and sheen. 

  • Don’t Wait to Get a Professional Opinion

By the time you notice that your hair’s texture and finish has changed, there’s a good chance that damage has already occurred.  A visit to the dermatologist can help you understand why your hair doesn’t seem as smooth or manageable as before.  Once you identify the culprit, you can start to get your hair back on the road to good health.

Sometimes men don’t realize that the change in their hair’s texture or appearance is due to male pattern baldness, telogen effluvium, or another type of alopecia that can be treated.  If you aren’t sure why your hair’s texture or appearance has changed and want a professional opinion, we’re here to help.  Simply fill out the questionnaire.  One of our board-certified dermatologists will review your case and make recommendations on what you can do to get your hair back on track.   

 

Resources:

(01) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4458934/

(02) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4458934/

(03) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5315033/

 

Is There a Genetic Test that Can Predict Hair Loss?

Nowadays, there’s a genetic test for just about everything.  Even to determine our dog’s lineage.   Just one quick saliva sample or blood test and, within days, you can find out if you’re destined for cancer, diabetes, or heart disease.  There’s even a DNA test to determine whether you’re likely to experience anxiety.  

Suppose a genetic test can give you accurate information to guide your health care plan and prevent future disease.  Can it also accurately predict whether you’re predisposed to losing your hair?  If a genetic test shows that you are likely to inherit your Great Uncle Bernie or Aunt Bonnie’s hairline, is there a way to ensure that you don’t follow in their footsteps?  Are genetic hair tests reliable?  Do dermatologists use DNA tests to help make diagnoses? Before you click “Buy Now” to order a genetic test kit, keep reading.  We’re here to answer your questions about genetic testing for male and female pattern baldness.

Can Alopecia Really be Inherited?

When people hear the word “alopecia,” they often think of hair loss caused by a medical condition.  Types of alopecia such as alopecia areata and lichen planopilaris are caused by autoimmune conditions.  Androgenetic alopecia, however, is a type of alopecia that is inherited.  It’s the most common type of alopecia.  As many as 80 percent of all men will experience male pattern baldness in their lifetime. (01)  In addition, many women experience female pattern baldness, usually around menopause.  

What’s the Link Between Genetics and Pattern Baldness?

A study conducted on twins confirms what we’ve long suspected.  Male and female pattern baldness have a genetic component. (02)  About 79 percent of men who were balding in the study could attribute their hair loss to their genes.  But, there’s a catch.  Researchers are still working to fully understand which genes are affected.  We’re still learning.  Here’s what we do know.  There are 63 genes that could potentially cause baldness.  Six of those are associated with the X chromosome, where the Androgen Receptors (AR) are found.  It’s also possible that not one isolated gene is the culprit.  Several genes working together may be to blame.

Can You Take a DNA Test to Determine Whether You Will Go Bald?

Ads make genetic testing very tempting, especially if your Mom or Dad starts losing their hair in their 20s.  It would be nice to know whether you will lose your hair too.  But, unfortunately, we’re not quite there yet.  As mentioned previously, there are still too many unanswered questions about which genes are involved and how the genetic process affects your locks. Also, false positives are not unusual with genetic testing.  You don’t want a test to tell you that you’ll experience androgenetic alopecia if that isn’t really the case. (03)

How do you Know if the Type of Alopecia You Have is Genetic?

When men and women experience androgenetic alopecia, they see specific hair loss patterns.  The first sign for men is usually a receding hairline.  The hair loss then progresses to the top, creating a horseshoe pattern above your ears that circles around to the back of your head.  Female pattern hair loss typically presents differently.  Women usually notice thinning on the top and crown.  Often, women will notice a widening of the center part.  Many other conditions cause hair loss besides androgenetic alopecia.  If you think your hair loss is genetic, be sure to have your dermatologist confirm your findings.  Early diagnosis is key to preventing further hair loss and to stimulating new growth.  You also want to make sure you’re addressing the right condition with the right treatment.  

Do Dermatologists Use Genetic Testing to Diagnose Male and Female Pattern Baldness?

The truth is that dermatologists don’t need high-tech tests to determine whether or not patients have androgenetic alopecia.  Most of the time, they can tell from your hair’s appearance and your hair loss pattern.  If there is any doubt, he or she may use a densitometer to magnify your hair follicles to see if miniaturization is occurring.  Miniaturization is when the hair follicles shrink, causing existing hair to fall out and preventing new growth.  Your dermatologist may order a biopsy and blood test to rule out other causes. Patients often ask about the benefits of running a hair analysis based on what they hear about on social media.   Hair analysis is not used to diagnose male or female pattern baldness.  Instead, it’s used to determine whether there’s lead, arsenic, or another substance causing your hair loss.  

What Can You Do to Treat Hair Loss Caused by Genetics?

Treatment for male or female pattern baldness is designed to meet two goals.  The first is to stop the progression of your hair loss.  The second is to promote new hair growth.   The best way to accomplish those two goals is by using a combination of medications simultaneously.  Here are medications often included in treatment plans for androgenetic alopecia:

  • Minoxidil topical foam – A vasodilator that enlarges the hair follicles
  • Finasteride, Dutasteride, or Spironolactone  – Prevents testosterone from converting to DHT that attacks the hair follicles and causes hair loss
  • Topical or oral cortisone – Treats any redness or irritation (not needed for evey patient)

Some men are concerned about experiencing sexual side effects with oral Finasteride.  If this is the case, topcial Finasteride has been proven to be just as effective without the side effects. (04)  Even better, topical solutions which mix Finasteride with Minoxidil, Cortisone and Retinol offer an even more effective all-in-one solution.  The retinol improves absorption of the other three medications.  

Are There Other Causes of Hair Loss Besides Genetics?

Male and female pattern hair loss are the only types of genetically induced alopecia.  However, other types of alopecia exist and treatment plans are designed to treat the type of alopecia you are experiencing.  Examples of other types of alopecia include:

  • Temporary Alopecia (Telogen Effluvium) – Occurs due to sudden illness, stress, or shock and usually reverses itself without treatment
  • Autoimmune Alopecia (Alopecia Areata and Lichen Planopilaris) – People experience flares and periods of remission
  • Trauma-induced Alopecia (Traction Alopecia and Trichotillomania) – Alopecia results from hairstyles that pull on the hair follicles or when people pull out their hair as a stress response)

Can You Prevent Hereditary Hair Loss?

Let’s play pretend for a minute.  Let’s say that a genetic test does exist that will determine whether or not you will lose your hair.  The tests come back showing that you are genetically predisposed to androgenetic alopecia.   Is there a way to prevent hair loss before it begins?  Sure, eating right, exercising, and managing stress never hurt.  But, even with that, you can’t necessarily fight Mother Nature.  That would be nice, though.  If male or female pattern baldness does rear its head, then it’s time to take action.  

Can You Reverse Hereditary Hair Loss

If you’re experiencing male or female pattern baldness and want to learn more about products available, contact us.  Although there isn’t a way to prevent androgenetic alopecia from occuring in the first place, there are things you can do to reverse the condition.   Minoxidil, Finasteride and other medications have been found to be safe and effective. Our board-certified dermatologists and hair specialists are available to answer your questions and help you develop the ideal treatment plan for your needs and lifestyle. 

 

Resources:

(01) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538178/

(02) https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article/60/8/1077/545174

(03) https://www.nature.com/articles/gim201838

(04) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6609098/

 

Hair Loss Reversal 101: What You Need to Know

If you’re experiencing hair loss, you’re not alone.  According to the American Hair Loss Association, at least two-thirds of all American men will have noticeable hair loss by the time they turn thirty-five.  Women account for forty percent of all Americans experiencing hair loss. (01) Those numbers are much higher than you thought, right?

Sure, most people expect to get some gray hair, wrinkles, and a few extra pounds as they age, but hair loss?  That’s not usually part of the plan.  We can color our hair, use Botox for our wrinkles, and spend some extra time at the gym.  But what can be done about a receding hairline?  More than you think.

There are Different Types of Hair Loss

The first step is to understand the different types of hair loss.  All hair loss is not the same, so not all hair loss will respond to the same treatment.  We’re here to give you a crash course.

The Term Alopecia Encompasses More Conditions Than Most People Realize

When people think of alopecia, they usually think of alopecia areata, the type that Massachusetts Representative Ayanna Pressley and actress Jada Pinkett Smith have.  However, if you use Dr. Google, you’ll see that WebMD defines alopecia areata as an “autoimmune disorder that causes your hair to come out, often in clumps the size and shape of a quarter.”  The definition is accurate, but not all hair loss is alopecia areata. Alopecia is an umbrella term for many different hair loss conditions.

There’s a Difference Between Non-Scarring and Scarring Alopecia

Alopecia falls under two broad categories:  non-scarring and scarring alopecia. There’s a big difference between the two types.

When people have non-scarring hair loss, their hair just falls out.  No redness, scaling, flaking, itching, or burning occurs. The alopecia can come on fast and furiously, leaving people holding clumps of hair in their hands, or gradually over a long period of time.

Scarring alopecia is a different story.  Also known as cicatricial alopecia, scarring alopecia is an inflammatory condition that occurs in otherwise healthy people. The hair follicle is destroyed and replaced with scar tissue.  The hair loss can happen over time and go unnoticed, or it can happen quickly, causing symptoms such as severe itching and burning. (02)  Speed is essential when it comes to treating scarring alopecias.  The goal is to slow or stop further hair loss and promote hair regrowth in unaffected areas.

What Type of Alopecia Do You Have?

Many different types of hair loss fall under the categories of non-scarring and scarring alopecia.  Once you know what type you have, your dermatologist will work with you to develop a treatment plan.

Examples of Non-scarring Alopecia

Telogen Effluvium

Telogen Effluvium is a form of temporary hair loss caused by stress, severe chronic illness, high fever, childbirth, thyroid disorders, major surgery, dieting, certain medications, etc.  Telogen Effluvium usually resolves itself over time.

Androgenic Alopecia

Also known as male and female pattern baldness, androgenic alopecia is a genetic condition experienced by up to 50 percent of men and women. (03)  Experts believe that pattern baldness is due to an excessive androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) response which causes hair follicles to miniaturize.  When the hair follicles shrink, hair loss occurs.  Androgenic alopecia typically causes frontal hair loss in men and diffuse hair loss at the crown and top of women’s heads.

Alopecia Areata

If your hair falls out in clumps around the size and shape of a quarter, you may have alopecia areata.  This condition is an autoimmune disorder that occurs when your body attacks its own hair follicles.  With alopecia areata, hair loss is unpredictable and can happen anywhere on your body.  Sometimes the condition resolves itself.  However, it can also reoccur without notice.  Many research studies are currently underway to understand the cause and effective treatment. (04)

Traction Alopecia  

Constant pulling on hair due to tight ponytails, buns, braids, cornrows or dreadlocks, hair extensions, weaves, and more can cause traction alopecia.  This condition, that’s common among actresses and models, can cause small bumps that resemble pimples.  Fortunately, traction alopecia can be reversed if you stop pulling your hair back.

Examples of Scarring Alopecia

Lichen Planopilaris

Lichen Planopilaris is the most common type of scarring alopecia.  Although it can affect both genders, lichen planopilaris is more likely to affect women aged 40 to 60 than men. (05)  Redness, itching, burning, and tenderness can accompany frontal or other pattern hair loss.

Central Centrifugal Cicatrical Alopecia (CCCA)

CCCA is found almost exclusively among black women aged 30 to 55 year-old.  The cause is still unknown and is being researched.  Women who experience CCCA experience inflammation and associated hair loss in the crown area. (06)

Effective Hair Loss Treatment Complements Your Diagnosis

After your dermatologist determines the cause of your hair loss, he or she will discuss treatment options with you.  Keep in mind that hair reversal treatments are not one-size-fits-all.  In some cases, “cocktails” which combine specific medications and protocols may be needed. Just to give you an idea of what’s out there, here are some of the most frequently used medications and treatments:

Minoxidil (Rogaine)

Minoxidil, also known as Rogaine, is available over-the-counter as a topical foam and liquid and by prescription as an oral pill.  Minoxidil is a vasodilator reduces miniaturization of the hair follicles and elongates the growth phase.

Minoxidil has proven to promote growth among men and women with male and female pattern hair loss.  Minoxidil is also often recommended to patients with scarring alopecia to promote growth in unaffected areas.

Once you start using Minoxidil, you need to continue. When you stop using the medication, any new hair that grows will most likely be shed.

Finasteride (Propecia, Proscar)

Finasteride is a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor originally designed to treat enlarged prostates.  The medication, available both as a pill and a topical solution, blocks the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a hormone that inhibits hair growth.

Clinical studies have found Finasteride to be highly effective in reversing hair loss in both men and women with scarring and non-scarring alopecias. (0708)  Topical Finasteride is often used to treat androgenic alopecia, while oral is typically recommended for scarring alopecias.

Finasteride is only available by prescription and is not recommended for women of childbearing age.  Check with a board-certified dermatologist to see if you are a good candidate for the topical or oral treatment.

Corticosteroids

Topical or injected steroids are often used to treat hair loss that is induced by autoimmune diseases such as alopecia areata and lichen planopilaris.  The corticosteroids allow hair to grow by inhibiting the autoimmune disease.

Steroid treatments are only available by prescription and should be surprised by a qualified dermatologist.

Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP) Injections

PRP injections have become a popular treatment for healing wounds and regrowing tissue such as tendons, ligaments, and muscles.

PRP has regenerative properties and has been primarily tested on patients with androgenetic alopecia. (09)  When injected into the scalp, PRP is believed to stimulate hair growth by increasing blood flow to the hair follicles and increasing the size of the hair shaft.

As the name suggests, PRP injections are made from platelets derived from your blood.  Blood is first drawn, and then spun at super high speeds to separate the blood components.  The resulting plasma is highly concentrated.

PRP use is still in its early stages and can be expensive.  Research also indicates that PRP is most effective when used with Minoxidil, Finasteride, and other hair growth treatments.

Biotin

Biotin, also known as Vitamin B7 or Vitamin H, has become a familiar hair growth supplement.  Sold in supplements or as an ingredient in hair care products, Biotin is promoted as a way to make your hair grow longer and healthier.

Does it work?  Well, the jury is out.  Not enough research has been conducted to say yeah or nay. (10)  It won’t hurt you to try a new shampoo that contains Biotin, but there’s no evidence to indicate that it will help.  Biotin deficiency is rare. (11)  Most people get adequate amounts through their regular diets.

Many Biotin supplements sold are not FDA approved, and high concentrations of Biotin can interfere with the results of some lab tests. (12) As with any oral supplement, check with your doctor before testing it out.

Hair Transplants

Hair transplant procedures and techniques continue to improve over time.  Rather than using noticeable plugs, today’s surgeries move hair strips or carefully selected hairs from one area to another to promote growth that looks natural.

When determining whether a patient is an ideal candidate for a hair transplant, dermatologists consider several factors, including:

  • Type of hair loss
  • Degree and pattern of baldness
  • Patient age
  • Hair color
  • Donor hair density
  • Patient expectations

Although hair transplants are expensive and time-consuming, they are an effective, reliable, and safe way to get lasting results.

It’s Important to Set Realistic Expectations When Treating Alopecia

We’re fortunate to live during a time when hair loss research is prolific, and the list of hair replacement options is growing.  Whether you’re 25 or 55, you don’t have to live with bald spots, a receding hairline, or thinning hair, even if your genetics or immune system are working against you.

The first step is to find a board-certified dermatologist and hair specialist you trust and get diagnosed.  He or she will help you select the right treatment option for your type of alopecia and lifestyle.  Remember to set realistic expectations for your hair regrowth.  Treatments don’t work overnight, so be patient and track your progress over time.  After all, small signs of stubble today can lead to a fuller head of hair tomorrow.

Resources:

(01) https://www.americanhairloss.org/

(02) https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/cicatricial-alopecia

(03) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK430924/

(04) https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/hair-loss/types/alopecia

(05) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK470325/

(06) https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/fullarticle/2768748

(07) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4809380/

(08) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9951956/

(09) https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/platelet-rich-plasma-does-the-cure-for-hair-loss-lie-within-our-blood-2020051119748

(10) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5582478/

(11) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5582478/

(12) https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/safety-communications/update-fda-warns-biotin-may-interfere-lab-tests-fda-safety-communication